Publications

Electronic versions are provided as a professional courtesy to ensure timely dissemination of academic work for individual, noncommercial purposes. Copyright and all rights therein resides with the respective copyright holders, as stated within each paper. These files may not be reposted without permission.

Filmer, H. L., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E. (in press). Object substitution masking for an attended and foveated target. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.

Dell'Acqua, R., Dux, P. E., Wyble, B., Doro, M., Sessa, P., Meconi, F., & Jolicoeur, P. (in press). The attentional blink impairs detection and delays encoding of visual information: Evidence from human electrophysiology. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

Becker, S. I., Grubert, A., & Dux, P. E. (in press). Distinct neural networks for target features verses dimension changes in visual search, as revealed by EEG and fMRI. Neuroimage.

Naughtin, C. K., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E. (in press). Distributed and overlapping neural substrates for object individuation and identification in visual short-term memory. Cerebral Cortex.


Filmer, H. L., Dux, P. E., & Mattingley, J. B. (in press). Application of transcranial direct current stimulation for understanding brain function. Trends in Neurosciences.


Schneider, D., Slaughter, V. P., & Dux, P. E. (in press). What do we know about implicit false-belief processing. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review.

Schneider, D., Slaughter, V. P., Becker, S. I., & Dux, P. E. (2014). Implicit false-belief processing in the human brain. Neuroimage,101, 268-275. (pdf)

Schneider, D., Nott, Z. E., & Dux, P. E. (2014). Task instructions and implicit theory of mind. Cognition,133, 43-47. (pdf)

Filmer, H. L., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E. (2014). Size (mostly) doesn't matter: the role of set size in object substitution masking. Attention Perception, & Psychophysics, 76, 1620-1629. (pdf)

Painter, D. R., Dux, P. E., Travis, S. L., & Mattingley, J. B. (2014). Neural responses to target features outside a search array are enhanced during conjunction but not unique-feature search. Journal of Neuroscience, 34, 3390-3401. (pdf)

Garner, K. G., Tombu, M. N., & Dux, P. E. (2014). The influence of training on the attentional blink and psychological refractory period. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 76, 979-999. (pdf)

Naughtin, C. K., Tamber-Rosenau, B. J., & Dux, P. E. (2014). The neural basis of temporal individuation and its capacity limits in the human brain. Journal of Neurophysiology, 111, 499-512. (pdf)

Dux, P. E., Wyble, B. P., Jolicoeur, P., & Dell'Acqua, R. (2014). On the costs of lag-1 sparing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 40, 416-428. (pdf)


Filmer, H. L., Mattingley, J. B., Marois, R., & Dux, P. E. (2013). Disrupting prefrontal cortex prevent performance gains from sensory-motor training. Journal of Neuroscience, 33, 18654-18660. (pdf)

Filmer, H. L., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E. (2013). Improved multitasking following prefrontal tDCS. Cortex, 49, 2845-2852. (pdf)

Schneider, D., Slaughter, V. P., Bayliss, A. P., & Dux, P. E. (2013). A temporally sustained implicit theory of mind deficit in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Cognition, 129, 410-417. (pdf)

Tamber-Rosenau, B. J., Dux, P. E., Tombu, M. N., Asplund, C. L., & Marois, R. (2013). Amodal processing in human prefrontal cortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 33, 11573-11587. (pdf)

Dux, P. E., Roseboom, W., & Olivers, C. N. L. (2013). Attentional tuning resets after failures of perceptual awareness. PLoS ONE, 8, e60623. (PLEASE COMMENT ON/RATE THIS ARTICLE)

Goodhew, S. C., Pratt, J., Dux, P. E., & Ferber, S. (2013). Substituting objects from consciousness: A review of object substitution masking. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 20, 859-877. (pdf)
 

Dale, G., Dux, P. E., & Arnell, K. A. (2013). Individual differences within and across attentional blink tasks revisited. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 75, 456-467. (pdf)

Travis, S. L., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E. (2013). On the role of working memory in spatial contextual cueing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 208-219. (pdf)


Bayliss, A. P., Naughtin, C. K., Lipp, O. V., Kritikos, A., & Dux, P. E. (2012). Make a lasting impression: The neural consequences of re-encountering people who emote inappropriately. Psychophysiology, 49, 1571-1578. (pdf)

Garner, K. G., Dux, P. E., Wagner, J., Cummins, T. D. R., Chambers, C. D., & Bellgrove, M. A. (2012). Attentional asymmetries in a visual orienting task are related to temperament. Cognition & Emotion, 26, 1508-1515. (pdf)

Schneider, D., Lam, R., Bayliss, A. P., & Dux, P. E. (2012). Cognitive load disrupts implicit theory of mind processing. Psychological Science, 23, 842-847. (pdf)

Dell'Acqua, R. Dux, P. E., Wyble, B., & Jolicoeur, P. (2012). Sparing from the attentional blink is not spared from structural limitations. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19, 232-238. (pdf)

Goodhew, S. C., Dux, P. E., Lipp, O. V., & Visser, T. A. W. (2012). Understanding recovery from object substitution masking. Cognition, 122, 405-415. (pdf)

Schneider, D., Bayliss, A. P., Becker, S. I., & Dux, P. E. (2012). Eye movements reveal sustained implicit processing of other's mental states. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 141, 433-438. (pdf)

Tombu, M. N., Asplund, C. L., Dux, P. E., Godwin, F. D., Martin, J. W., & Marois, R. (2011). A unified attentional bottleneck in the human brain. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 108, 13426-13431. (pdf)

Kelly, A. J., & Dux, P. E. (2011). Different attentional blink tasks reflect distinct information processing limitations: An individual differences approach.
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37, 1867-1873. (pdf)

Scalf, P. E., Dux, P. E., & Marois, R. (2011). Working memory encoding delays top-down attention to visual cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23, 2593-2604. (pdf)

Goodhew, S. G., Visser, T. A. W., Lipp, O. V., & Dux, P. E. (2011). Implicit semantic perception in object substitution masking. Cognition, 118, 130-134. (pdf)

Goodhew, S. C., Visser, T. A. W., Lipp, O. V., & Dux, P. E. (2011). Competing for consciousness: prolonged mask exposure reduces object substitution masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37, 588-596. (pdf)

Dux, P. E., Visser, T. A. W., Goodhew, S. C., & Lipp, O. V. (2010). Delayed re-entrant processing impairs visual awareness: an object substitution masking study. Psychological Science, 21, 1242-1247. (pdf)

Harris, I. M., Benito, C. T., & Dux P. E. (2010). Priming from distractors in RSVP is modulated by image properties and attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 36, 1595-1608. (pdf)

Mayberry, C. R., Livesey, E. J., & Dux, P. E. (2010). Rapid learning of rapid temporal context. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 17, 417-420. (pdf).

Dux, P. E., & Marois, R. (2009). The attentional blink: a review of data and theory. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 71, 1683-1700. (pdf)


Dux, P. E., Tombu, M. N., Harrison, S., Rogers, B. P., Tong, F., & Marois, R. (2009). Training improves multitasking performance by increasing the speed of information processing in human prefrontal cortex. Neuron, 63, 127-138. (pdf)

Dux, P. E., Asplund, C. L., & Marois, R. (2009). Both exogenous and endogenous target salience manipulations support resource depletion accounts of the attentional blink: A reply to Olivers, Spalek, Kawahara & Di Lollo (2009). Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16, 219-224. (pdf

Buckholtz, J. W., Asplund, C. L., Dux, P. E., Zald, D. H., Gore, J. C., Jones, O. D., & Marois, R. (2008). The neural basis of third-party punishment. Neuron, 60, 930-940. (pdf) (click here for forward by Haushofer & Fehr)

Dux, P. E., & Marois, R. (2008). Distractor inhibition predicts individual differences in the attentional blink. PLoS ONE, 3, e3330. (PLEASE COMMENT ON/RATE THIS ARTICLE) 

Dux, P. E., Asplund, C. L., & Marois, R. (2008). An attentional blink for sequentially presented targets: evidence in favor of resource depletion accounts. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 15, 809-813. (pdf) 

Dux, P. E., & Coltheart, V. (2008). Repetition blindness and repetition priming: Effects of featural differences between targets and distractors on RSVP dual-target search. Memory & Cognition, 36, 776-790. (pdf)

Harris, I. M., Dux, P. E., Benito, C. T., & Leek, E. C. (2008). Orientation sensitivity at different stages of object processing: evidence from repetition priming and naming. PLoS ONE, 3, e2256. (PLEASE COMMENT ON/RATE THIS ARTICLE)

Dux, P. E., & Marois, R. (2007). Repetition blindness is immune to the central bottleneck. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14, 729-734. (pdf) 

Dux, P. E., & Harris, I. M. (2007). On the failure of distractor inhibition in the attentional blink. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14, 723-728. (pdf) 

Dux, P. E., & Harris, I. M. (2007). Viewpoint costs occur during consolidation: evidence from the attentional blink. Cognition, 101, 47-58. (pdf) 

Dux, P. E., Ivanoff, J. G., Asplund, C. L., & Marois, R. (2006). Isolation of a central bottleneck of information processing with time-resolved fMRI. Neuron, 52, 1109-1120. (pdf) 

Dux, P. E., Coltheart, V., & Harris. I. M. (2006). On the fate of distractor stimuli in rapid serial visual presentation. Cognition, 99, 355-382. (pdf) 

Harris, I. M., & Dux, P. E. (2005). Turning objects on their heads: The influence of the stored axis on object individuation. Perception & Psychophysics, 67, 1010-1015. (pdf) 

Dux, P. E., & Coltheart, V. (2005). The meaning of the mask matters: evidence of conceptual interference in the attentional blink. Psychological Science, 16, 775-779. (pdf) 

Harris, I. M., & Dux, P. E. (2005). Orientation-invariant object recognition: evidence from repetition blindness. Cognition, 95, 73-93. (pdf) 

Coltheart, V., Mondy, S., Dux, P. E., & Stephenson, L. (2004). Effects of orthographic and phonological word length on memory for lists shown at RSVP and STM rates. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 30, 815-826. (pdf)